Category Archives: Learning Issues

How to develop a strategy using Distant Foresight Index (DFI)

DFI helps the organisations to identify potential distant threats and also helps them devise a plan of action when the need arises. It was created in response to the question, How A few businesses detect and respond to future threats and also capitalise on vague opportunities while the others fail? another important question is why are the business leaders unprepared? the answer is that the tools or frameworks that are used mainly focus on the immediate environment of the industry such as war games, strategic planning, market trends, etc. also in many industries, the incentives are based on short term goals thus the leaders are biased towards encouraging activities that strengthen the existing domains rather than exploring new ones. thus without a reliable and structured framework such as DFI recognising and implementing distant innovation will always be a risk to the organisation. Read More>>

Startups using technology to foster Human connections among ageing people

Miami based healthcare startup called Papa was started in 2016 by Parker are currently striving to link ageing seniors with college students in order to reduce the problems of loneliness and social isolation that comes with age. It also serves as a major upgrade to the caregiving industry with its idea of bridging the gap between generations that adds enthusiasm, joy and delight, also these acts of empathy make one’s life worth living. Owing to Papa’s success another California-based startup Mon Ami has stepped into the same market and recently announced a $3.4 million seed financing round. Read More>>

Is Internet Hijacking our minds

 Former Google product manager Tristan Harris told Wired magazine, “technology steers what 2 billion people are thinking and believing every day.”A study shows that an average American uses his phone to browse media for 10.5hrs when he is awake and checks it almost 52 times a day. rather than being disheartened by these reports if we start to declutter our minds we can have better understanding, improved awareness, productivity and also enhance our creativity. But here is how you can do it Read More>>

The Attraction Effect

Franconeri a professor of management and organizations at the Kellogg School and a professor of psychology in the Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences claims that the newspapers and other marketing platforms take advantage of a cognitive biasing phenomenon known as the Attraction effect or the Decoy effect, this simply involves making certain options more appealing than the other thereby persuading the user to make irrational and quick decisions. Further, he tried to study the effect of interactive visualisations on decision making of the readers, it was proven that unless a complex decision making was broken down into a series of simpler ones the users still made irrational decisions. he thus concludes that visualisations are only helpful when they help, rather than replace human judgement. he also claims such interactions between humans and computers are the future of complex decision making. Read More>>

The Rocket Doesn’t Come With a Moral Compass

In a startup journey, founders learn practical business skills: how to raise money, manage people and burn rate, and launch and grow a product. They learn about their own abilities, tactics for managing their psychology, and how to stretch beyond what they believed they could do. But what about the liberal arts education that universities pride themselves on? The critical thinking skill that is considered to be the hallmark of a university education? What about empathy, morality, patience, humility, and discipline? Do startups teach these things? Read More>>

Understanding University Intellectual Policy and Commercialization

For many years, the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) Innovation Policy and the Economy Working Group has published research to understand incentives relative to university intellectual property (IP) policy and commercialization. Based upon their research, we now know incentive alignment counts – and through that lens – Bob Litan, former Vice President of Research and Policy at the Kauffman Foundation, and  Lisa Mitchell, the author of the research blog proposed the potential to drive a faster path to market with a little testing of policy.  Read More>>

A new study on the state of entrepreneurship in the U.S.

The Kauffman Index of Growth Entrepreneurship is an indicator of business growth in the United States, integrating several high-quality sources of timely information into one composite indicator of entrepreneurial business growth. The Index captures growth entrepreneurship in all industries, and is based on data covering the universe of all U.S. employer businesses (approximately 5 million firms) and a privately collected benchmark of growth businesses. This allows to measure business growth from both revenue and job growth perspectives. Moreover, present trends on business exits—more particularly initial public offerings, a business milestone commonly associated with innovative, high-growth companies are put forward.  Read More>>

Weak ties matter

In 1973, Stanford sociology professor Mark Granovetter published an empirical paper called The Strength of Weak Ties. Professor Granovetter is one of the pioneers of social network theory, and is “unofficially” short-listed for the Nobel Prize in Economics. His work influenced approaches to everything from analyzing links between virtual communities in Second Life to building strong product teams. Read More>>

Who has their hand on the tap of deal flow?

We are surrounded by the birth, growth and death of new ideas that feed the venture capital industry. Investors are aware of the connection between temperament and success as an entrepreneur, but they might not understand the way in which it affects the set of investment options. Many would-be student-entrepreneurs have a temperament that prevents them from being good at selling or justifying their ideas to others. Read More>>

The Next Amazon (Or Apple, Or GE) Is Probably Failing Right Now

Policy-makers concerned with entrepreneurship have long favoured the “shots on goal” approach: Try to encourage as many startups as possible. Most of those companies will fail. Of the survivors, most will never grow into major economic engines. But statistically, a few will turn out to be the next Amazon, with huge rewards for their local economies.
In theory, it is those ambitious companies that policy-makers should be working the hardest to foster. The problem is that no one has known how to identify them. Read More>>