Category Archives: Leadership

IS YOUR INNOVATION PROCESS A CORPORATE ILLUSION?

There are six common blind spots that severely constrain the performance of innovation labs. Research and Development accelerators and incubators have generated poor innovation results and poor investment returns. These blind-spots are weak navigational direction, a focus on tweaks and enhancements, a lack of credibility with the corporate core, the mismanagement of the fear associated with disruption, the failure to reconcile mindset differences, and sheer impatience. The best way to fight the effect of these blind-spots is to leverage team diversity and facilitate leadership capabilities.   Read More >>

Start-ups: The Founding Team Is a Real Magic Bullet

The majority of new ventures fail prematurely.  A lot of this failure is due to a lack of collaboration within founding teams.  Important, early decisions are prone to conflict. Examples of these decisions include funding, development, etc.  Because tensions are so high, investors often look at the team-dynamic as much as the start-up product itself. Strong teams can overcome and navigate turbulence, leading them to success.  Founders of start-ups are in a unique situation, as they can build and craft their whole team from the ground-up. Teams should be made of both unique skills, and people with interpersonal skills.  The culture that the originating team sets usually lasts long after the staff rotates out.  Read More >>

Your Work Friends and Enemies are Affecting your Performance

Conflict may appear to be two-sided, but this is not usually true.  The basis of most conflict at work is tryadic: when there are three parties involved.  The third party is often the key to relieving tension and restoring balance. When employees feel socially balanced at work, they tend to perform better.  Researchers from Northwestern University, Harvard Business School, and University of California teamed up to discover how social triangles change over time.  They ruled relationships into four categories: a friend of a friend is a friend, a friend of an enemy is an enemy, an enemy of an enemy is a friend, and an enemy of a friend is an enemy.  If all four rules are satisfied in a tryad, the tryad is balanced. There are two possibilities for this, which are when all three people like each other, and when two friends have a mutual enemy.  Balanced relationships are important because employees tend to make better and more profitable decisions than when they are in an unbalanced situation.  Read More >>

What You can Learn from Being Asked to Resign

Being asked to resign can be an incredibly painful experience.  However, dealing with this confrontation can lead to insight of how the company is doing, and what is going wrong.  Many people asked to resign are caught off-guard, and receive criticism. This honest constructive criticism can lead to one’s future success.  While alarming at the time, constructive criticism is a gift that allows one to listen to others’ concerns and re-evaluate one’s own actions. Listening and allowing oneself to be vulnerable will help one bloom into future jobs, or keep the ones they already.   Read More >>